A Number of Foods are Toxic to Cats

Any food not specifically formulated for cats can affect the digestive system, causing vomitingdiarrhea, or loss of appetite. Here are some foods of particular concern: 

  • Alcohol. Yes, cats too can get drunk, but it can also easily cause severe liver and brain damage. As little as a tablespoon can put an adult cat in a coma; a little more can kill her.
  • Chocolate. The compound in chocolate that is of major concern is theobromine. It is in all forms of chocolate, and most concentrated in dark chocolate and unsweetened baking chocolate. Consumption can cause heart arrhythmias, muscle tremors, or seizures. Chocolate also contains caffeine.
  • Coffee, Tea, Energy Drinks. These and other caffeinated drinks and foods can cause your cat to become restless, have rapid breathing, heart palpitations, muscle tremors.
  • Dairy Products. Cats can become lactose intolerant when they become adults. If ingested by these cats, dairy products can cause vomiting and diarrhea.
  • Fat Trimmings, Raw Meat, Eggs, Fish. Please consult your veterinarian or a veterinary nutritionist first before adding these foods to your cat's diet, as there is a risk vomitingdiarrhea, Salmonella or E. coli associated with these foods for some animals, especially when given improperly.
  • Grapes and Raisins. Cats are not likely to eat these, and there are no reports of cats becoming ill from these foods. However, dogs can sufferacute kidney failure from eating grapes or raisins, so it is best to not to risk your cat's health and not let him eat these foods.
  • Onions and Garlic. All members of the onion family can cause problems if eaten in sufficient quantity. A little bit of onion or garlic in some sauce is not likely to cause any problems. However, eating a clove of garlic or a green onion may cause digestive upset. Eating some type of onion on a regular basis could cause anemia. Baby food made from meat is often seasoned with onion or garlic, so read the labels carefully if you feed these to your cat.
  • Tuna. Tuna when made into cat food is perfectly fine for cats. On the other hand, tuna sold for human consumption may cause digestive upset when given as an occasional treat in small amounts. It can even cause a painful condition called steatitis, or inflammation of the body's fat, when fed to cats on a regular basis.
  • Xylitol. This is a sweetener used in a lot of sugar-free foods, especially chewing gum. There are no records of cats becoming ill from this product, but in dogs it can cause a severe drop in blood sugar followed by liver failure. Therefore it is better to be safe and not let your cat eat foods that contain this ingredient.

 Immediate Care

 If you suspect your cat ate any of these foods, try to determine how much she may have eaten.

  1. Call your veterinarian for specific advice; in many cases small quantities are not likely to be a problem but larger quantities may require you to induce vomiting in your cat or to take her to your veterinarian.
  2. If your veterinarian is unavailable or unequipped to handle the situation, call the nearest animal hospital or the Pet Poison Helpline at 1-855-213-6680. This is especially important if your cat is displaying symptoms such as muscle tremors or repeated vomiting.

 Veterinary Care 

Treatment 

Treatment involves supportive care until symptoms resolve. This may involve hospitalization, intravenous fluids, monitoring of organ function via repeated blood testing, and other measures as indicated by the specific circumstances. 

Prevention 

The best prevention is obviously to keep your food out of reach of your cat. An added advantage of not giving your cat your food is the prevention of begging behavior. If you choose to give your cat human food, follow these guidelines:

http://www.petmd.com/cat/emergency/poisoning-toxicity/e_ct_human_food_poisoning

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 Another equally useful article with even more info:

Top Household Hazards for Cats

Your cat is curious, sticking his nose into random spaces and places. Exploring may expose him to some not so obvious dangers in your home. It just takes a bit of time and know-how to “cat-proof” your house so your kitty stays healthy and safe.

Human Medicines

Some human over-the-counter and prescription medicines pose a serious threat to your cat, so keep them in a place he can’t get into.

  • Antidepressants
  • Cancer medicines
  • Cold medicines
  • Diet pills
  • Pain relievers (acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofen)
  • Vitamins and other supplements

You may have heard that some common medicines work for people and cats. Never medicate your cat without first talking to your vet, though -- it's easy to give your cat a fatal overdose. 

Human Foods 

Many cats crave people food, but this human fare can be poisonous to your feline:

  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine (coffee, soda, tea)
  • Chives
  • Chocolate
  • Garlic 
  • Grapes
  • Onions
  • Raisins
  • Xylitol (found in sugarless gums, candies, toothpastes)
  • Yeast dough

Indoor and Outdoor Plants   

Common houseplants -- as well as ones that you may bring into your home -- can be hazardous to your cat's health: 

  • Aloe
  • Azaleas
  • Chrysanthemums
  • Lilies
  • Marijuana
  • Mistletoe
  • Poinsettia
  • Rhododendron
  • Tulips

Insecticides and Other Chemicals

Some chemicals taste especially good to cats. To prevent accidental pet poisoning, keep these and all chemicals locked away:

  • Antifreeze
  • Bleach
  • Detergents
  • De-icing salts (which pets may walk through, then lick from their pads)
  • Dog flea and tick medication (pills, collars, sprays, shampoos)
  • Fertilizers
  • Herbicides
  • Insect and rodent bait

More Household Hazards

These common household items can choke or strangle your cat. Some may even lead to intestinal blockages.

  • Chicken bones
  • Dental floss, yarn, string
  • Holiday decorations, including lights and tinsel
  • Toys with small or movable parts

If Your Cat’s Been Poisoned

Every moment matters if you think your cat has been exposed to something toxic.

Call your vet. Post your veterinarian's phone number in an obvious place, along with the number for the Animal Poison Control Center: (888) 426-4435. They can help you know what to do next.

Collect samples. Take samples of vomit, stool, and the poison your cat consumed to the vet with your cat.

Watch for symptoms. Symptoms of poisoning in cats include:

  • Breathing problems
  • Confusion
  • Coughing
  • Depression
  • Diarrhea
  • Dilated pupils
  • Gastrointestinal irritation
  • Salivation
  • Seizures
  • Shivering
  • Skin irritation
  • Tremors
  • Vomiting
  • Weakness

Educate. After your cat recovers, call your poison control center or humane society to let them know what happened to your pet, so they can track problem poisons and help prevent other pet poisonings.

http://pets.webmd.com/cats/guide/top-10-cat-poisons

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 Cat Trivia

  • It has been scientifically proven that owning cats is good for our health and can decrease the occurrence of high blood pressure and other illnesses.
  • Stroking a cat can help to relieve stress, and the feel of a purring cat on your lap conveys a strong sense of security and comfort.
  • The ancient Egyptians were the first civilisation to realise the cat's potential as a vermin hunter and tamed cats to protect the corn supplies on which their lives depended.
  • Sir Isaac Newton is not only credited with the laws of gravity but is also credited with inventing the cat flap.
  • A cat has more bones than a human being; humans have 206 and the cat has 230 bones.
  • A cat's hearing is much more sensitive than humans and dogs.
  • The cat's tail is used to maintain balance. 
  • Cats see six times better in the dark and at night than humans.
  • Cats eat grass to aid their digestion and to help them get rid of any fur in their stomachs.
  • A healthy cat has a temperature between 38 and 39 degrees Celcius.
  • Cats have the largest eyes of any mammal.
  • The female cat reaches sexual maturity at around 6 to 10 months and the male cat between 9 and 12 months.
  • A female cat will be pregnant for approximately 9 weeks or between 62 and 65 days from conception to delivery. 
  • The average litter of kittens is between 2 - 6 kittens.
  • Ailurophile is the word cat lovers are officially called.
  • Purring does not always indicate that a cat is happy. Cats will also purr loudly when they are distressed or in pain.
  • All cats need taurine in their diet to avoid blindness. Cats must also have fat in their diet as they are unable to produce it on their own.
  • In households in the UK and USA, there are more cats kept as pets than dogs. At least 35% of households with cats have 2 or more cats.
  • When a cats rubs up against you, the cat is marking you with it's scent claiming ownership.
  • About 37% of American homes today have at least 1 cat.
  • Milk can give some cats diarrhea.
  • The average lifespan of an outdoor-only cat is about 3 to 5 years while an indoor-only cat can live 16 years or much longer.
  • On average, a cat will sleep for 16 hours a day.
  • A domestic cat can run at speeds of 30 mph.
  • The life expectancy of cats has nearly doubled over the last fifty years.
  • Blue-eyed, white cats are often prone to deafness.
  • The cat's front paw has 5 toes and the back paws have 4. Cats born with 6 or 7 front toes and extra back toes are called polydactl.
  • An adult cat has 30 teeth, 16 on the top and 14 on the bottom.
  • There are approximately 60,000 hairs per square inch on the back of a cat and about 120,000 per square inch on its underside.
  • Cats and kittens should be acquired in pairs whenever possible as cat families interact best in pairs

http://www.catsinfo.com/catfacts.html